Welcome to Dobos Multimedia...

Dobos Multimedia is my personal web site, a place for my portfolio and contact details. My name is Alex Dobson, and I have been a Web Developer / Web Designer since 2000. If you would like to know more about me, click Alex Dobson or take a look at one of my profiles on the right.

The main purpose of this web site is to document some of the work that I have been involved with before I loose track... so really this site is as much for me as it is for you! However, it is possible that you are looking at this site because I gave you my CV or card, or you are trying to find me... if so 'Welcome' & browse on!


I have created a guided tour, which is a small usability feature you can use instead of the browsing in the traditional sense. Just follow the 'next' links on each page.

 

Profiles...

Alex Dobson's Facebook Profile
Alex Dobson's facebok profile

Alex Dobson's LinkedIn Profile
View Alex Dobson's profile on LinkedIn

Stuff I like...

Below is a widget that I built to read RSS feeds, in this case TED - the title says it all!

These video podcasts capture the most extraordinary presentations delivered from the TED stage.

  • Smelfies, and other experiments in synthetic biology | Ani Liu
    What if you could take a smell selfie, a smelfie? What if you had a lipstick that caused plants to grow where you kiss? Ani Liu explores the intersection of technology and sensory perception, and her work is wedged somewhere between science, design and art. In this swift, smart talk, she shares dreams, wonderings and experiments, asking: What happens when science fiction becomes science fact?
  • The data behind Hollywood's sexism | Stacy Smith
    Where are all the women and girls in film? Social scientist Stacy Smith analyzes how the media underrepresents and portrays women -- and the potentially destructive effects those portrayals have on viewers. She shares hard data behind gender bias in Hollywood, where on-screen males outnumber females three to one (and behind-the-camera workers fare even worse.)
  • A few ways to fix a government | Charity Wayua
    Charity Wayua put her skills as a cancer researcher to use on an unlikely patient: the government of her native Kenya. She shares how she helped her government drastically improve its process for opening up new businesses, a crucial part of economic health and growth, leading to new investments and a World Bank recognition as a top reformer.
  • A robot that eats pollution | Jonathan Rossiter
    Meet the "Row-bot," a robot that cleans up pollution and generates the electricity needed to power itself by swallowing dirty water. Roboticist Jonathan Rossiter explains how this special swimming machine, which uses a microbial fuel cell to neutralize algal blooms and oil slicks, could be a precursor to biodegradable, autonomous pollution-fighting robots.
  • The racial politics of time | Brittney Cooper
    Cultural theorist Brittney Cooper examines racism through the lens of time, showing us how historically it has been stolen from people of color, resulting in lost moments of joy and connection, lost years of healthy quality of life and the delay of progress. A candid, thought-provoking take on history and race that may make you reconsider your understanding of time, and your place in it.
  • Nationalism vs. globalism: the new political divide | Yuval Noah Harari
    How do we make sense of today's political divisions? In a wide-ranging conversation full of insight, historian Yuval Harari places our current turmoil in a broader context, against the ongoing disruption of our technology, climate, media -- even our notion of what humanity is for. This is the first of a series of TED Dialogues, seeking a thoughtful response to escalating political divisiveness. Make time (just over an hour) for this fascinating discussion between Harari and TED curator Chris Anderson.
  • Don't fear superintelligent AI | Grady Booch
    New tech spawns new anxieties, says scientist and philosopher Grady Booch, but we don't need to be afraid an all-powerful, unfeeling AI. Booch allays our worst (sci-fi induced) fears about superintelligent computers by explaining how we'll teach, not program, them to share our human values. Rather than worry about an unlikely existential threat, he urges us to consider how artificial intelligence will enhance human life.
  • How jails extort the poor | Salil Dudani
    Why do we jail people for being poor? Today, half a million Americans are in jail only because they can't afford to post bail, and still more are locked up because they can't pay their debt to the court, sometimes for things as minor as unpaid parking tickets. Salil Dudani shares stories from individuals who have experienced debtors' prison in Ferguson, Missouri, challenging us to think differently about how we punish the poor and marginalized.
  • 3 ways to fix a broken news industry | Lara Setrakian
    Something is very wrong with the news industry. Trust in the media has hit an all-time low; we're inundated with sensationalist stories, and consistent, high-quality reporting is scarce, says journalist Lara Setrakian. She shares three ways we can fix the news to better inform all of us about the complex issues of our time.
  • How to practice safe sexting | Amy Adele Hasinoff
    Sexting, like anything that's fun, runs its risks -- but a serious violation of privacy shouldn't be one of them. Amy Adele Hasinoff looks at problematic responses to sexting in mass media, law and education, offering practical solutions for how individuals and tech companies can protect sensitive (and, ahem, potentially scandalous) digital files.
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