Welcome to Dobos Multimedia...

Dobos Multimedia is my personal web site, a place for my portfolio and contact details. My name is Alex Dobson, and I have been a Web Developer / Web Designer since 2000. If you would like to know more about me, click Alex Dobson or take a look at one of my profiles on the right.

The main purpose of this web site is to document some of the work that I have been involved with before I loose track... so really this site is as much for me as it is for you! However, it is possible that you are looking at this site because I gave you my CV or card, or you are trying to find me... if so 'Welcome' & browse on!


I have created a guided tour, which is a small usability feature you can use instead of the browsing in the traditional sense. Just follow the 'next' links on each page.

 

Profiles...

Alex Dobson's Facebook Profile
Alex Dobson's facebok profile

Alex Dobson's LinkedIn Profile
View Alex Dobson's profile on LinkedIn

Stuff I like...

Below is a widget that I built to read RSS feeds, in this case TED - the title says it all!

These video podcasts capture the most extraordinary presentations delivered from the TED stage.

  • The most important thing you can do to fight climate change: talk about it | Katharine Hayhoe
    How do you talk to someone who doesn't believe in climate change? Not by rehashing the same data and facts we've been discussing for years, says climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. In this inspiring, pragmatic talk, Hayhoe shows how the key to having a real discussion is to connect over shared values like family, community and religion -- and to prompt people to realize that they already care about a changing climate. "We can't give in to despair," she says. "We have to go out and look for the hope we need to inspire us to act -- and that hope begins with a conversation, today."
  • "Top Knot Turn Up" / "Bad Habits" | Madame Gandhi and Amber Galloway-Gallego
    "Music is so much more than sound simply traveling through the ear," says sign language interpreter Amber Galloway-Gallego. In a spirited performance, musician and activist Madame Gandhi plays two songs -- "Top Knot Turn Up" and "Bad Habits" -- while Galloway-Gallego provides an animated sign language interpretation.
  • How to be "Team Human" in the digital future | Douglas Rushkoff
    Humans are no longer valued for our creativity, says media theorist Douglas Rushkoff -- in a world dominated by digital technology, we're now just valued for our data. In a passionate talk, Rushkoff urges us to stop using technology to optimize people for the market and start using it to build a future centered on our pre-digital values of connection, creativity and respect. "Join 'Team Human.' Find the others," he says. "Together let's make the future that we always wanted."
  • How to find the person who can help you get ahead at work | Carla Harris
    The workplace is often presented as a meritocracy, where you can succeed by putting your head down and working hard. Wall Street veteran Carla Harris learned early in her career that this a myth. The key to actually getting ahead? Get a sponsor: a person who will speak on your behalf in the top-level, closed-door meetings you're not invited to (yet). Learn how to identify and develop a productive sponsor relationship in this candid, powerful talk.
  • Why you should treat the tech you use at work like a colleague | Nadjia Yousif
    Imagine your company hires a new employee and then everyone just ignores them, day in and day out, while they sit alone at their desk getting paid to do nothing. This situation actually happens all the time -- when companies invest millions of dollars in new tech tools only to have frustrated employees disregard them, says Nadjia Yousif. In this fun and practical talk, she offers advice on how to better collaborate with the technologies in your workplace -- by treating them like colleagues.
  • 3 kinds of bias that shape your worldview | J. Marshall Shepherd
    What shapes our perceptions (and misperceptions) about science? In an eye-opening talk, meteorologist J. Marshall Shepherd explains how confirmation bias, the Dunning-Kruger effect and cognitive dissonance impact what we think we know -- and shares ideas for how we can replace them with something much more powerful: knowledge.
  • How storytelling helps parents in prison stay connected to their kids | Alan Crickmore
    When a parent is sent to prison, the unintended victims of their crimes are their own children -- without stability and support, kids are at higher risk for mental health and development issues. In a heartfelt talk, Alan Crickmore explains how the charity Storybook Dads is keeping families connected through the simple act of storytelling.
  • The work that makes all other work possible | Ai-jen Poo
    Domestic workers are entrusted with the most precious aspects of people's lives -- they're the nannies, the elder-care workers and the house cleaners who do the work that makes all other work possible. Too often, they're invisible, taken for granted or dismissed as "help," yet they continue to do their wholehearted best for the families and homes in their charge. In this sensational talk, activist Ai-Jen Poo shares her efforts to secure equal rights and fair wages for domestic workers and explains how we can all be inspired by them. "Think like a domestic worker who shows up and cares no matter what," she says.
  • A lesson on looking | Amy Herman
    Are you looking closely? Visual educator Amy Herman explains how to use art to enhance your powers of perception and find connections where they may not be apparent. Learn the techniques Herman uses to train Navy SEALs, doctors and crime scene investigators to convert observable details into actionable knowledge with this insightful talk.
  • How to motivate people to do good for others | Erez Yoeli
    How can we get people to do more good: to go to the polls, give to charity, conserve resources or just generally act better towards others? MIT research scientist Erez Yoeli shares a simple checklist for harnessing the power of reputations -- or our collective desire to be seen as generous and kind instead of selfish -- to motivate people to act in the interest of others. Learn more about how small changes to your approach to getting people to do good could yield surprising results.
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